Masses Of Wildflowers To Tame The Masses

I consider any thing with a bloom to be a flower. It is no secret that I like many weeds and wilflowers as much as “tame” blossoms. I grew up surrounded by fields that led to the woods and creeks. My bare sweaty legs fought off chiggers and ticks that hid in the wild Queen Anne’s lace and what ever those yellow things were that grew along side them. The fields were home to wild strawberries and snakes as well. Purple flowerheads poked through green stalks here and there.  My absolute favorites were the yellow and brown Black-eyed Susans spread throughout the acres. It could have been a kindred thing since we shared a name. At any rate, I’ve carried them in my heart all these years and grown them myself. Still, their beauty never matches those wild ones of my memory.

Several weeks ago Dirt Man, Wylie and I traveled through some rural back roads of North Carolina. I was both surprised and delighted to see farm field after field of wild buttercups. The huge bright mass of yellow warmed me all over and brought a smile to my face. It made me think back to when my sister and I were little girls. She’d tickle my chin with the bud, and say some kind of little rhyme. If the yellow reflected on my chin in the sunshine, she’d tell me it meant I liked butter. We often picked wildflowers and tied them into flower necklaces and bracelets. We ran barefoot through the flowers like gypsy children.

These were planted along side the NC highways. I don’t know what they are called. Could they be blue bells or blue bonnets? They were certainly a lovely sight to partake. Blue gives me a feeling of calm. Streaks of blue stretched down both sides of the roadway until another type of wildflower took reign.

These poppies are divine. I thought the buttercups were like pure sunshine, so I guess the orange were like bursts of fire.

Lovely flowers along the highway makes driving/riding less stressful. I enjoy seeing the countryside, whether I get to explore by foot or vehicle. It’s something quite peaceful about taking in the sights that nature offers. I especially love it when I ride down major highways and  see sights like this when I least expect it.

35 thoughts on “Masses Of Wildflowers To Tame The Masses

    • I once had a flower bed in my back yard grow filled with these tiny white blooms…gorgeous I thought, until my MIL came to visit and chastised me for growing a bed of weed, I think chickweed!

  1. Thanks, Suzi!

    Black Eyed Susans (and daisies) are my favorites too. But that field of orange poppies . . . spectacular.

    Running barefoot through the fields is such a great way to grow up . . . as long as you don’t step on any snakes. 😉

    • Did that a couple of times, and made me wear shoes the next few times! Yes, those poppies are amazing! Virginia plants wildflowers in area, but it’s usually a mixture. I love that NC spread one type over a mass area so one lone color is spectacular!

  2. Hi Suzicate! I think your blue flowers might be forget-me-nots. They aren’t bluebells, which have a more elongated appearance. And, having lived in Texas, there’s no way they could be bluebonnets — once you’ve seen those, you won’t soon forget them! Lovely poppies, by the way.

    • For some reason I thought forget me nots had a bit of yellow in the center…I should remember but I don’t, my aunt used to pick them and boil them for a poison ivy/oak ointment.

    • I actually think your blue flowers are Baby Blue Eyes–http://www.mckenzieseeds.com/product_detail.aspx?productID=100773.
      I’m not trying to sell a product, btw–I’m looking for flowers for my garden, and the picture you put up was so pretty I had to find out what it was so that I might be able to plant them. 😉

  3. Lovely flowers! If it ever stops raining in southeastern Saskatchewan, we may have flowers again too 😛

    We used to do the same thing with buttercups…hold one under your chin and if it reflected yellow, you love butter. Guess I must have had gold under my chin because I love butter…my husband asks me if I want some bread with my butter lol

    Thanks for sharing those, suzi – they are inspiring.

  4. Hi Suzi!

    I stopped by yesterday and for some reason your comments were turned off.

    Oh well…glad to see they’re on today.

    “The huge bright mass of yellow warmed me all over and brought a smile to my face. It made me think back to when my sister and I were little girls. She’d tickle my chin with the bud, and say some kind of little rhyme. If the yellow reflected on my chin in the sunshine, she’d tell me it meant I liked butter.”

    You have no idea how many wonderful memories that brought back for me and my childhood – I use to do the same thing!!!

    Gorgeous photos, Suzi! Those poppies are stunning. The first photo makes me wanna run through that beautiful field like Julie Andrews in The Sound of Music; singing….”The hills are alive…with the sound of music!”

    Lovely share, my friend! Have a wonderful weekend!

    X

    • WordPress had automaticallt turned it off, and I didn’t know until someone left a message on my FB page. The next time I see a field of wild flowers I’m going to do just that in your honor! (I apologize in advance for my horrid singing voice, but the sentiment will be there!)

  5. I am hoping to get out and find some wildflowers this weekend, too. It has been a long wet and cold Spring, but I see things starting to pop open. I really need some time out in nature with my camera to lose the stress of the past few weeks.
    Thanks for sharing your flower pictures they brightened my day … I hope I can hunt some down to share, also.

  6. I, too, think it was a great idea to plant the wildflowers along the roads. Virginia has the wildflower license plate that donates part of the tag price to support the planting of them.

  7. Well, first of all, I love this title! And second, I believe weeds are only flowers growing in the wrong place. I love wildflowers too…even when they are in the wrong place–like my yard. I’m coming to the conclusion that, if it’s green, it’s acceptable.

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